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Honda HR-V automatic shudder/shake from start off

I’ve come across this problem now twice on Honda HR-V/HRV automatics whereby the car will do a big shudder/shake/judder/vibration from a stand still start. Having done my own research into it at the time it relates in most instances to the automatic transmission fluid is past its best and the clutch brake is sticking when the car comes to stand still. When you then try to pull away the brake does not disengage in time and you get the sudden judder and shake of the car. As you can imagine this will probably not do the car much good in the long term so the solution is as follows: 1) Buy official Honda Automatic transmission fluid. This will either be Honda CVT Fluid or Honda ATF Premium fluid. Your Honda dealer will advise the current recommendation. 2) Drain the transmission fluid as follows: 2.1) Bring the tranismission up to normal operating temperature. Drive the vehicale to do this or run the engine until the radiator fan comes on. 2.2) Park the car on a level surface and turn the engine off. 2.3) Remove the transmission drain plug as pictured below and drain fluid into a suitable container. 2.3) Reinstall drain plug (or new one if it looks damaged/corroded). 3) Refill with the transmission fluid from 1) to the recommended level You should then find the HR-V’s shudder/judder has stopped. If you still experience the issues then the transmission will probably need to be looked at by a qualified Honda technician. Good luck and let me know if this helps...

Removing wp_head() elements (rel=’start’, etc.)...

In customising WordPress you may find a need to occasionally remove or add to the Link elements that WordPress automatically outputs in the function call wp_head(). I’ve recently had a need to remove the rel=’prev’ and rel=’next’ link elements and in trying to avoid customising the core WordPress functions the following solutions works. Ensure you have a functions.php file in your theme directory that you are using. If not create the file and edit the file. The following lines will help remove select lines from your wp_head() function: remove_action( 'wp_head', 'feed_links_extra', 3 ); // Removes the links to the extra feeds such as category feeds remove_action( 'wp_head', 'feed_links', 2 ); // Removes links to the general feeds: Post and Comment Feed remove_action( 'wp_head', 'rsd_link'); // Removes the link to the Really Simple Discovery service endpoint, EditURI link remove_action( 'wp_head', 'wlwmanifest_link'); // Removes the link to the Windows Live Writer manifest file. remove_action( 'wp_head', 'index_rel_link'); // Removes the index link remove_action( 'wp_head', 'parent_post_rel_link'); // Removes the prev link remove_action( 'wp_head', 'start_post_rel_link'); // Removes the start link remove_action( 'wp_head', 'adjacent_posts_rel_link'); // Removes the relational links for the posts adjacent to the current post. remove_action( 'wp_head', 'wp_generator'); // Removes the WordPress version i.e. - WordPress 2.8.4 Don’t remove these items unless you have a need to. The WordPress generator removal could be useful if you are not religiously upgrading your WordPress install as it helps hide the WP version from potential hackers to a certain...

RGB to HEX Converter

Working with CSS I am constantly trying to convert RGB values from Photoshop to their hex equivalent. There is probably a setting in PhotoShop that I have missed, but the following small form will quickly convert RGB values to the HEX equivalent. You can then use these values in CSS with # at the beginning. Let me know if you find this useful: R: G: B:...

HTTP Response Header Checker

HTTP Response Header Checker The HTTP Response is the information returned in the HTTP Protocol when you access URL’s over the Internet. Google, Yahoo and in fact all browsers rely on this information to determine if the information you are trying to access has been found or if not what may of happened to it. The full HTTP response contains a variety of information that a web server will send in response to a HTTP request. This information can yield interesting information such as the web server a site is hosted upon, the scripting language used and most importantly the response code. The following search box allows you to enter a URL and see the full HTTP Response. Why is this useful you may be thinking? Well Google, etc rely on the response codes to determine if they index your site. For a resource to be indexed you will most often than not be looking for a ‘200 ok’ response. If a page is missing you may get a ‘404 page not found’. If a page has gone you may look for a ‘410 Gone’ response to be sent back. Feel free to use this tool I have developed to test your URL’s HTTP response: Domain: Response...

The long forgotten robots.txt

I am still amazed at how many web sites still don’t employ a robots.txt file at the root of their web server.  Even SEO firms or people claiming to be SEO experts have them missing which I find very funny.  There also countless arguments of whether you still need to have a robots.txt, but my advice is if the search engine robots still request it then I’d rather have it there with the welcome mat to the site. For those of you who don’t know the history of a robots.txt file then i’d suggest you have a Google or Wikipedia for it.  In short it ‘s a text file that specifies which parts of a web site to ‘index’ and ‘crawl’ and/or which parts to not index.  You can also get specific and setup up rules based on a certain spiders and crawlers. To start with you need to create a text file called robots.txt and place in the root of your web host.  You should be able to access it through your web browser at www.yourdomain.com/robots.txt You can view other web sites robots.txt files by accessing the robots.txt at the root of their domain.   If you want Google, etc. to come into your site and index everything then things are very easy.  Simply add the following to your robots.txt file and away you go: User-agent: * Disallow: Alternatively if you wish to stop all pages in your site being indexed then the following should be present in your file: User-agent: * Disallow: / To stop robots indexing a folder called images and another called private you would add a Disallow line for each folder: User-agent: * Disallow: /images/ Disallow: /private/ The above would still index the rest of the site, but anything in those folders would be excluded from search engine results. To disallow a file you specify the file as above with a folder: User-agent: * Disallow: /myPrivateFile.htm If you only wanted Google access to your site you specify the following: User-agent: Google Disallow: User-agent: * Disallow: / If you are looking at getting your site fully indexed then I would put the first example in your robots.txt...